Energy

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After ‘end of the world’ explosion, Quebec town tries to find hope

Yannick Gagne, at his Lac-Mégantic bar, the Musicafé, before a train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded on July 6, 2013, creating a fire that killed 30 people in the bar and reduced it to cinders.

Eight months ago, the people of Lac-Mégantic thought the world was ending.
A runaway 72-car train carrying a volatile variety of crude oil derailed and exploded in this community of 6,000, killing 47 people and destroying the town center.

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Prominent anti-wind activists investigated by Maine Attorney General

Maine Attorney General Janet Mills

Two of the state’s most prominent anti-wind activists and the non-profit organization they run are under investigation by Maine Attorney General Janet Mills for alleged conflicts of interest that may have benefitted them financially at the expense of the organization. Continue Reading →

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PUC ponders what’s next for multimillion-dollar wind deal vacated by court

Turbines at Northeast Wind's Mars Hill Project

Now what?

That’s the question being asked by regulators, utilities and representatives of one of the biggest business deals to hit the state in a long time, after Maine’s high court invalidated regulatory approval of that deal.

The deal is a complex transaction, worth hundreds of millions of dollars, to build wind turbines across the region. Continue Reading →

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High court overrules agency OK of multi-million-dollar wind energy deal

Chief Justice Leigh Saufley, photo BDN

A 2012 deal worth hundreds of millions of dollars to expand wind energy projects across the Northeast was dealt a blow Tuesday by the Maine supreme court, which ruled that a state agency's approval of the complex deal was invalid. The transaction included prominent wind developer First Wind, Maine utility companies Bangor Hydro and Maine Public Service and Nova Scotia-based electric utilities owner Emera, Inc. Continue Reading →

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Rural citizens lose battle to have say in wind tower rezoning

Sign at the intersection of Long Falls Dam and Sandy Stream roads, Highland Plantation

“I feel like a citizen who is seen to be of less value than my neighbors,” said Karen Bessey Pease, after Maine Senate Democrats Wednesday sidelined an effort to give her and other residents of the state’s most rural areas a say in whether wind towers are built in their communities.

“We just asked to have the same rights to determination of zoning issues in our community as our next-door neighbors have,” said Pease, of Lexington Township. “It’s very unfortunate that the Senate voted the way they did.” Continue Reading →

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Lawmakers want to restore rights to residents in wind tower zones

Legislators on the Energy, Utilities and Technology Committee discussing LD 616 during a break in a work session on June 4, 2013

A legislative committee today sided with residents in some of the state's western mountains in their fight to have more say over the construction of industrial wind towers in their backyards. If the full legislature approves the bill, it would be the first significant blow to the state's ambitious Wind Energy Act. Continue Reading →

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Wind power’s grip on Augusta weakening as ‘God’s Country’ presses its case

View of Bald Mountain from Highland Plantation

They came from the townships and plantations of Concord, Lexington, Highland, Carrying Place and Pleasant Ridge. They set out for the statehouse in Augusta from the five sparsely populated backcountry communities set between the Kennebec and Carrabassett rivers, from a wooded intervale etched by streams, dappled by lakes and cradled by the hills and mountains of western Maine. Continue Reading →

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Sanford legislator calls for state to help towns plan for climate change effects

Rep. William Noon, D-Sanford

Two freshman legislators have filed bills to make dealing with climate change once again a priority for state government.

Rep. Paul McGowan, D-York, submitted a bill designed to make Maine more energy independent and sets goals such as reducing fossil fuel use by 20 percent. Continue Reading →

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Energy firms announced deal despite risk posed by legal appeal

Workers unload tower components for wind turbines in Searsport.  Photo Abigail Curtis, BDN

Less than two weeks ago, a Canadian energy company and a major wind power developer with turbines in Maine announced they had closed a deal worth hundreds of millions of dollars to expand wind power projects across the Northeast. But the announcement left out one important fact that could jeopardize the deal: Legal appeals had been filed just days before by the state’s Office of the Public Advocate and a Maine utility company challenging a ruling by a state agency that cleared the way for the joint venture. “I was somewhat surprised” to see the announcement that the deal had closed, said Eric Bryant, the attorney in the Public Advocate’s office who filed one of the appeals. “It’s unusual for a company to make a decision when there’s risk involved that it may have to undo it because of a legal matter.”

The partnership is between Emera, a Canadian energy company that owns electric utilities in the Northeastern US, Atlantic Canada and elsewhere, and First Wind, which develops, constructs, operates and owns utility-scale wind projects across the United States and in Hawaii. First Wind is the Northeast’s largest wind power developer and has four major wind projects in Maine, with a fifth, Bull Hill, under construction. Continue Reading →

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Utility regulators used broad authority in approving wind deal

The Maine Public Utilities Commission recently issued a decision in a hotly contested case allowing Emera, the Nova Scotia company that owns Bangor Hydro and Maine Public Service, to create a new company with First Wind, a major wind power developer. The three-member regulatory body decided that the economic development benefits of the project had so much potential that they could approve it while imposing enough conditions to protect utility customers. In its decision, the PUC went against the recommendations of its own experienced staff and all of the parties to the case, other than the applicants.  Those parties, including the Maine Public Advocate, represented utility customers and the Northern Maine Independent System Administrator, the neutral body responsible for maintaining electric reliability in northern Maine. According to a report by the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting, a principal focus of the PUC decision was the potential the new entity would have for creating jobs in Maine, perhaps more than any other development now on the horizon.  Though Maine’s unemployment rate is well below the national level, job creation remains near the top of voters’ concerns. That the PUC should give economic considerations great weight while finding that its conditions were sufficient to provide consumer protection reflects a broad view of its mandate. Continue Reading →

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