‘Fundamental reality’: State’s system for helping crime victims a failure

Geoffrey Rushlau, district attorney for Sagadahoc, Waldo, Lincoln and Knox counties

District attorneys from across the state are as frustrated as crime victims with the fundamental reality of the restitution system in Maine: it's broken. Maine crime victims are waiting for millions of dollars – perhaps as much as $12 million – in payments ordered by the courts from the people who stole their money, broke into their car or burglarized their home. Continue Reading →

Veterans’ group victimized by $50k fraud — and then by justice system

Members of the York American Legion Post 56. Left to right_ Jim Fitzpatrick, Kandace Minihane, Bill Hallisey, Commander Robin Greene, Chuck Arboch, Pete Doe, and Robert Seeley

In 1977, the Maine legislature amended the state criminal code to require courts to consider ordering restitution because it can “reinforce the offender's sense of responsibility,” let him pay back his debt to society and the victim, and “ease the burden of the victim.” But 37 years later, this has long been easier said than done, with those assigned the task of collecting restitution pointing to the futility of trying to get money from poor offenders. They cite a variant of the cliché: “It’s like trying to get blood from a turnip.” Continue Reading →

LePage, utilities commissioner at odds over ethics

David Littell, PUC commissioner

Gov. Paul LePage has rejected Public Utilities Commissioner David Littell's decision to recuse himself from voting on a case involving bottled water giant Nestle Waters and the Fryeberg Water Co. Littell claims he has a conflict of interest because he previously worked at a Portland law firm that represented Nestle and the water company. Lepage says that isn't enough to disqualify him for voting on the case. Continue Reading →

Maine’s D.C. delegation raises doubts about fed response to hazardous materials rail shipments

Sen. Susan Collins

If a railroad spilled thousands of gallons of oil in Maine, no one in the state – or in Washington – knows what the railroads would do or if they’re prepared for such a disaster. Members of Maine's congressional delegation say that’s the reason they are pushing federal regulators to strengthen planning, response and mitigation requirements for railroads that transport hazardous materials such as highly flammable crude oil. Continue Reading →

Public advocate reverses position on giant wind energy deal

One of the wind turbines in the Stetson project, Township 8 Range 3, owned by Northeast Wind

The state public advocate’s office, which represents the interests of utility customers in Maine, has withdrawn its opposition to a multimillion-dollar transaction to build wind turbines across Maine and the Northeast.

The move was made, said Public Advocate Timothy Schneider, after his office reviewed its previous position and decided that the deal would neither undermine state utility regulation nor would it threaten ratepayers with higher energy prices. Continue Reading →